Your Daily Dose of Financial News

Demolition of an old house
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New York’s Department of Financial Services has reached an agreement with Deutsche Bank that will see the German firm pay $205 million as part of a settlement to resolve state banking law violations over its Forex operations – Law360 and WSJ

Disney’s reportedly “close to winning US antitrust approval” for its deal to purchase 21st Century Fox’s entertainment assets – Bloomberg

And, on cue, the bidding war has commenced.  On Wednesday, Disney “sharply increased” its offer for Fox as it looks to outcompete Comcast.  Disney’s new bid marks a 35% increase over its previous offer and about a $6 billion improvement over Comcast’s proposal – NYTimes and WSJ and Bloomberg and Law360

Some thoughts on Disney’s revised approach – NYTimes and WSJ

As the brewing global trade war becomes increasingly tangible, Daimler is the first major company to “cut its profit outlook” due to the “escalating trade tensions between the U.S. and China” – Bloomberg and WSJ

Real estate services giant Cushman & Wakefield has filed preliminary plans for an IPO with hopes of a $5 billion valuation and $1 billion coming in the door – WSJ

Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan have named Dr. Atul Gawande—a Harvard professor and practicing surgeon at Boston’s Brigham & Women’s Hospital—as CEO of their new independent health care company for their US employees – NYTimes and WSJ and Bloomberg

Speaking of the ‘zon, the Journal helps us understand how Bezos, Inc. has brought his everything-creep approach to Washington D.C., both in lobbying prowess and in government contracting – WSJ

First it was sabotage, now it’s hacking and insider theft.  It’s been quite a week of revelations from Tesla – WSJ

What does big data mean in the friendly skies? Well, for starters, perhaps a little birthday treat or some extra special treatment for frequent fliers. But, as usual when it comes to trading privacy for convenience, we’re on a slippery slope here – WSJ

MDR

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